kenobi-wan-obi:

Strange Super-Earth Planet Has ‘Plasma’ Water Atmosphere

A nearby alien planet six times the size of the Earth is covered with a water-rich atmosphere that includes a strange “plasma form” of water, scientists say.
Image: An artist’s rendition of Gliese 1214 b traveling in front of its star, shown in blue light. Credit: NAO
Astronomers have determined that the atmosphere of super-Earth Gliese 1214 b is likely water-rich. However, this exoplanet is no Earth twin. The high temperature and density of the planet give it an atmosphere that differs dramatically from Earth.
"As the temperature and pressure are so high, water is not in a usual form (vapor, liquid, or solid), but in an ionic or plasma form at the bottom the atmosphere — namely the interior — of Gliese 1214 b," principle investigator Norio Narita of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan told SPACE.com by email.


Rarely do I love the universe more than when it looks at Doctor Who and goes “pfft please we can do better than that.”

kenobi-wan-obi:

Strange Super-Earth Planet Has ‘Plasma’ Water Atmosphere

A nearby alien planet six times the size of the Earth is covered with a water-rich atmosphere that includes a strange “plasma form” of water, scientists say.

Image: An artist’s rendition of Gliese 1214 b traveling in front of its star, shown in blue light. Credit: NAO

Astronomers have determined that the atmosphere of super-Earth Gliese 1214 b is likely water-rich. However, this exoplanet is no Earth twin. The high temperature and density of the planet give it an atmosphere that differs dramatically from Earth.

"As the temperature and pressure are so high, water is not in a usual form (vapor, liquid, or solid), but in an ionic or plasma form at the bottom the atmosphere — namely the interior — of Gliese 1214 b," principle investigator Norio Narita of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan told SPACE.com by email.

Rarely do I love the universe more than when it looks at Doctor Who and goes “pfft please we can do better than that.”

(via stellarreqs-roulette)

lefthandedjanice:

This rock is the best fucking rock. It’s the best colour and it’s frosty which is my favourite and it makes these super cute stalagmites that look like Mario hills. It’s called Chrysocolla and it’s amazing.

Aw man I used to have a really pretty chrysocolla specimen!  

lefthandedjanice:

This rock is the best fucking rock. It’s the best colour and it’s frosty which is my favourite and it makes these super cute stalagmites that look like Mario hills. It’s called Chrysocolla and it’s amazing.

Aw man I used to have a really pretty chrysocolla specimen!  

(via stalkingbit)

spaceexp:

The Clearest Image of a Sunspot Ever Taken, Courtesy of the Big Bear Solar Observatory

…I lack words.

spaceexp:

The Clearest Image of a Sunspot Ever Taken, Courtesy of the Big Bear Solar Observatory

…I lack words.

(via tokuu-basthet)

spaceplasma:

Solar tornado five times the size of the Earth

This enormous tornado erupting from the surface of the sun is big enough to swallow the Earth. In fact, it could swallow five Earths.

Discovered using NASA’s Solar Dynamic Observatory satellite, this colossal twisting mass is made up of superheated gas at a temperature of between 90,000 and 3.6 million degrees Fahrenheit.

Over the course of three hours, this behemoth reached up from the sun’s surface to a height of 125,000 miles, or roughly half the distance between the Earth and the moon. The hot gases were whipped up to nearly 186,000 miles per hour. In comparison, the wind speed of terrestrial tornadoes generally reaches a paltry 100 miles per hour.

Scientists have previously seen smaller solar tornadoes with other sun-observing satellites but this one — spotted in September 2011 — is thought to be the first one ever filmed. Since then, researchers have seen at least one more solar tornado, an Earth-sized twister.

These tornadoes often precede events known as coronal mass ejections — huge eruptions of charged particles that blast out of the sun’s surface with tremendous energy.  Such flare-ups are thought to be related to interactions among the sun’s magnetic field lines, whose corkscrewing movements also shape the solar tornado.

Credit: NASA/SDO/AIA/Aberystwyth University/Li/Morgan/Leonard

This is about as awesome as it gets, guys.

I was gonna say cool but then I realized

(via arcadiasilver)

oh-thank-cheesecake:

weshouldreallytalkaboutanime:

ink-blob:

amicusbalderdash:

darksideoftheshroom:

“The Lions Mane Jellyfish is the largest jellyfish in the world. They have been swimming in arctic waters since before the dinosaurs (over 650 million years ago) and are among some of the oldest surviving species in the world. The largest can come in at about 6 meters and has tentacles over 50 meters long.”



The ocean is a crazy fucking place

That is terrifying

i think this jellyfish is perfect

WARNING: EXPO IS AN INSUFFERABLE PEDANT ALERT
That is not a Lion’s Mane jellyfish.  Lion’s Mane jellies look like this:

And don’t get me wrong, Lion’s Manes can get pretty damn big.  Just not THAT big.  Their bells get up to about 2-3” across at the biggest. What’s really impressive about Lion’s Manes is the length of their tentacles: they can reach well over ten feet long.
That guy up in the original post, though, is actually a Nomura’s Jellyfish, and they sure as hell can reach almost human-sized.  


They are also a giant menace, as they come in gigantic swarms that break fishing nets and can even pose a capsizing hazard for small fishing boats that try to pull in nets in Nomura-infested waters:


(They do not, however, get so big as to be able to dwarf a human.  The diver in the pic up there is ‘shopped in.)

oh-thank-cheesecake:

weshouldreallytalkaboutanime:

ink-blob:

amicusbalderdash:

darksideoftheshroom:

“The Lions Mane Jellyfish is the largest jellyfish in the world. They have been swimming in arctic waters since before the dinosaurs (over 650 million years ago) and are among some of the oldest surviving species in the world. The largest can come in at about 6 meters and has tentacles over 50 meters long.”

image

The ocean is a crazy fucking place

That is terrifying

i think this jellyfish is perfect

WARNING: EXPO IS AN INSUFFERABLE PEDANT ALERT

That is not a Lion’s Mane jellyfish.  Lion’s Mane jellies look like this:

And don’t get me wrong, Lion’s Manes can get pretty damn big.  Just not THAT big.  Their bells get up to about 2-3” across at the biggest. What’s really impressive about Lion’s Manes is the length of their tentacles: they can reach well over ten feet long.

That guy up in the original post, though, is actually a Nomura’s Jellyfish, and they sure as hell can reach almost human-sized.  

They are also a giant menace, as they come in gigantic swarms that break fishing nets and can even pose a capsizing hazard for small fishing boats that try to pull in nets in Nomura-infested waters:

(They do not, however, get so big as to be able to dwarf a human.  The diver in the pic up there is ‘shopped in.)

sturmtruppen:

thejesusofequestria:

Breaking: Florida residents confused and frightened by cloud

all hail the glow cloud

SCIENCE TIME!

I have been informed, listeners, by my dear friend <3~Carlos~<3 that this is almost certainly a noctilucent cloud left over from a rocket launch (those happen in Florida too, apparently).  ”And frankly,” he went on to say, as I fought to maintain my composure in the face of such uncanny beauty, “it’s pretty damn boring, as those go.”

Boring, you ask?  How could a glow-cloud hovering in the wake of a massive missile launched from our tiny, pathetic rock into the vastness of space possibly be boring?  Well, listeners, Carlos proceeded to hand me a folder full of images, and wow.

I know what you’re thinking, folks: that’s totally an extradimensional wormhole like the ones we get right here in Night Vale on Sundays and equinoxes, but nay—according to Carlos this is the exact same phenomenon that is probably responsible for the Floridian fluorescence, except it’s in Norway, of all places.  

So nice try, Florida glow cloud, but until you gain sentience and telepathic mastery of human consciousness OR start turning cartwheels and imitating portals to other universes, I just can’t get all that excited about you.

…you did get me a science date with Carlos, though, so I guess you’re not all bad.

(Source: theyoungbloodofsuburbia, via angelcide)

talkingsoup:

colossaltitan:

Meet Ventricaria ventricosa. It’s algae. It’s found throughout the ocean, especially in tropical regions. Grows out somewhere between 1.5 and 2 inches in diameter.
this is terrifying because it’s a single-celled organism. that green blob is one cell. Just one cell. What on earth. like
big organelles inside? no. just a TON of them. tons of microscopic organelles floating around inside one of the biggest single-celled organisms in existence. I want to poke it with a stick

holy science

The Ocean: Proving Lovecraft Right, One Life-Form at a Time

talkingsoup:

colossaltitan:

Meet Ventricaria ventricosa. It’s algae. It’s found throughout the ocean, especially in tropical regions. Grows out somewhere between 1.5 and 2 inches in diameter.

this is terrifying because it’s a single-celled organism. that green blob is one cell. Just one cell. What on earth. like

big organelles inside? no. just a TON of them. tons of microscopic organelles floating around inside one of the biggest single-celled organisms in existence. I want to poke it with a stick

holy science

The Ocean: Proving Lovecraft Right, One Life-Form at a Time

the-savage-avenger:

scutter2:

estifi:

thexyaffair:

2013 is going to be an amazing year.

Here’s the schedule for this comet.

August and September 2013. The comet should become visible in August and September 2013 to observers at dark locations using small telescopes or possibly even binoculars.
October 2013. Comet ISON should become visible to the unaided eye, but only barely in the early part of the month. The comet will be sweeping in front of the constellation Leo then. It’ll pass first near Leo’s brightest star Regulus, then near the planet Mars. Maybe these brighter objects will help you find it that month. Meanwhile, the comet itself will be getting brighter during October.
November 2013. Comet ISON will continue to brighten throughout the month as it nears its late November perihelion (closest point to our sun). Plus ISON will pass very close to the bright star Spica and the planet Saturn, both in the constellation Virgo.  Its perihelion (closest point to our sun) on November 28 will be an exciting time. The comet will come within 800,000 miles (1.2 million km) of our sun’s surface. If all goes well, and the comet doesn’t break up (as comets sometimes do), the terrific heating Comet ISON will undergo when it’s closest to our parent star might turn the comet into a brilliant object. Some are predicting that ISON will become as bright as a full moon! That would make Comet ISON a daylight object, briefly. Remember, though, at perihelion, Comet ISON will appear close to the sun on the sky’s dome (only 4.4° north of the sun on November 28). Although the comet will be bright, you’ll need to look carefully to see it in the sun’s glare. Some expert help around this time might be called for, and we’ll announce comet-viewing parties as we hear about them.
December 2013. This may be the best month to see Comet ISON, assuming it has survived its close pass near the sun intact. The comet will be visible both in the evening sky after sunset and in the morning sky before sunrise. As ISON’s distance from the sun increases, it’ll grow dimmer. But, for a time, it should be as bright as our sky’s brightest planet, Venus, and it should have a long comet tail. People all over Earth will be able to see it, but it’ll be best seen from the Northern Hemisphere as 2013 draws to a close.
January 2014. Will ISON still be visible to the eye? Hopefully. And on January 8, 2014, the comet will lie only 2° from Polaris — the North Star.


If this doesn’t deserve a reblog I’m not sure what does.

Everything will change when the Fire Nation attacks…

That uncomfortable moment when this post pops up on my dash twelve hours or so after I watch a TV movie about a extremely visible comet that turns out to be a rogue planet-killing missile.

the-savage-avenger:

scutter2:

estifi:

thexyaffair:

2013 is going to be an amazing year.

Here’s the schedule for this comet.

August and September 2013. The comet should become visible in August and September 2013 to observers at dark locations using small telescopes or possibly even binoculars.

October 2013. Comet ISON should become visible to the unaided eye, but only barely in the early part of the month. The comet will be sweeping in front of the constellation Leo then. It’ll pass first near Leo’s brightest star Regulus, then near the planet Mars. Maybe these brighter objects will help you find it that month. Meanwhile, the comet itself will be getting brighter during October.

November 2013. Comet ISON will continue to brighten throughout the month as it nears its late November perihelion (closest point to our sun). Plus ISON will pass very close to the bright star Spica and the planet Saturn, both in the constellation Virgo.  Its perihelion (closest point to our sun) on November 28 will be an exciting time. The comet will come within 800,000 miles (1.2 million km) of our sun’s surface. If all goes well, and the comet doesn’t break up (as comets sometimes do), the terrific heating Comet ISON will undergo when it’s closest to our parent star might turn the comet into a brilliant object. Some are predicting that ISON will become as bright as a full moon! That would make Comet ISON a daylight object, briefly. Remember, though, at perihelion, Comet ISON will appear close to the sun on the sky’s dome (only 4.4° north of the sun on November 28). Although the comet will be bright, you’ll need to look carefully to see it in the sun’s glare. Some expert help around this time might be called for, and we’ll announce comet-viewing parties as we hear about them.

December 2013. This may be the best month to see Comet ISON, assuming it has survived its close pass near the sun intact. The comet will be visible both in the evening sky after sunset and in the morning sky before sunrise. As ISON’s distance from the sun increases, it’ll grow dimmer. But, for a time, it should be as bright as our sky’s brightest planet, Venus, and it should have a long comet tail. People all over Earth will be able to see it, but it’ll be best seen from the Northern Hemisphere as 2013 draws to a close.

January 2014. Will ISON still be visible to the eye? Hopefully. And on January 8, 2014, the comet will lie only 2° from Polaris — the North Star.

If this doesn’t deserve a reblog I’m not sure what does.

Everything will change when the Fire Nation attacks…

That uncomfortable moment when this post pops up on my dash twelve hours or so after I watch a TV movie about a extremely visible comet that turns out to be a rogue planet-killing missile.

(via skullvis)

moderation:

Scientists ‘freeze’ light for an entire minute
—
In what could prove to be a major breakthrough in quantum memory storage and information processing, German researchers have frozen the fastest thing in the universe: light. And they did so for a record-breaking one minute.
It sounds weird and it is. The reason for wanting to hold light in its place (aside from the sheer awesomeness of it) is to ensure that it retains its quantum coherence properties (i.e. its information state), thus making it possible to build light-based quantum memory. And the longer that light can be held, the better as far as computation is concerned. Accordingly, it could allow for more secure quantum communications over longer distances.
Needless to say, halting light is not easy — you can’t just put in the freezer. Light is electromagnetic radiation that moves at 300 million meters per second. Over the course of a one minute span, it can travel about 11 million miles (18 million km), or 20 round trips to the moon. So it’s a rather wily and slippery medium, to say the least.
But light can be slowed down and even halted altogether. And in fact, researchers once kept it still for 16 seconds by using cold atoms.
(via Io9)

I love living in the future.

moderation:

Scientists ‘freeze’ light for an entire minute

In what could prove to be a major breakthrough in quantum memory storage and information processing, German researchers have frozen the fastest thing in the universe: light. And they did so for a record-breaking one minute.

It sounds weird and it is. The reason for wanting to hold light in its place (aside from the sheer awesomeness of it) is to ensure that it retains its quantum coherence properties (i.e. its information state), thus making it possible to build light-based quantum memory. And the longer that light can be held, the better as far as computation is concerned. Accordingly, it could allow for more secure quantum communications over longer distances.

Needless to say, halting light is not easy — you can’t just put in the freezer. Light is electromagnetic radiation that moves at 300 million meters per second. Over the course of a one minute span, it can travel about 11 million miles (18 million km), or 20 round trips to the moon. So it’s a rather wily and slippery medium, to say the least.

But light can be slowed down and even halted altogether. And in fact, researchers once kept it still for 16 seconds by using cold atoms.

(via Io9)

I love living in the future.

(via arcadiasilver)

COSMOS 2014 // x

/chews own arm

Let this new series be for the current generation what the original Cosmos was for mine.

(Source: witlesswyrm, via angelcide)

johnathan328:

Waterspouts at the lava flows from Kilauea.


Oh, wow.

johnathan328:

Waterspouts at the lava flows from Kilauea.

Oh, wow.

(via icarus-suraki)

kqedscience:

Crazy living rock is one of the weirdest creatures we’ve ever seen
“The fact that this sea creature looks exactly like a rock with guts is not even the weirdest thing about it. It’s also completely immobile like a rock — it eats by sucking in water and filtering out microorganisms — and its clear blood mysteriously secretes a rare mineral called vanadium.&#8221;

They are also edible and considered a delicacy.

kqedscience:

Crazy living rock is one of the weirdest creatures we’ve ever seen

The fact that this sea creature looks exactly like a rock with guts is not even the weirdest thing about it. It’s also completely immobile like a rock — it eats by sucking in water and filtering out microorganisms — and its clear blood mysteriously secretes a rare mineral called vanadium.”

They are also edible and considered a delicacy.

(via drneverland)

thefrogman:

What if other planetary bodies orbited our world at the same distance as the moon?

Scale by Brad Goodspeed [website | vimeo | twitter]

[video] [h/t: porygon-d]

I am having trouble articulating how deeply the Jupiter one unsettles me.

(via omnicat)

audreyneedsalife:

45-70govt:

mother fucker you are standing on lava and are on fire get the fuck out of there



Today in Volcanologists are Fucking Crazy People, Part 2 of an Ongoing Series

audreyneedsalife:

45-70govt:

mother fucker you are standing on lava and are on fire get the fuck out of there

Today in Volcanologists are Fucking Crazy People, Part 2 of an Ongoing Series

(Source: stigmartyr762, via drneverland)


Closeup of the tentacles of Portuguese Man O’War. Photo by Simon de Glanville

You wanna know what the coolest thing about these bad boys is?
Each different kind of tentacle is actually a whole different type of organism.  
Portuguese Man (Men?) o&#8217; War aren&#8217;t actually jellyfish at all (though they both belong to the same phylum), but siphonophores, colonial organisms that mass together into what appears to be one creature. Each different organism that makes up the different tentacles and the gas-filled swimming float has its own specialized function, and they work together symbiotically.  

Closeup of the tentacles of Portuguese Man O’War. Photo by Simon de Glanville

You wanna know what the coolest thing about these bad boys is?

Each different kind of tentacle is actually a whole different type of organism.  

Portuguese Man (Men?) o’ War aren’t actually jellyfish at all (though they both belong to the same phylum), but siphonophores, colonial organisms that mass together into what appears to be one creature. Each different organism that makes up the different tentacles and the gas-filled swimming float has its own specialized function, and they work together symbiotically.  

(Source: , via icarus-suraki)