thatwarmtoastyfeeling:

Harpy eagles have a wingspan that’s longer than I am tall

lies down on the ground that’s so cool

I am pretty sure that Harpies and Wedge-Tails are larger than I am in general.


Closeup of the tentacles of Portuguese Man O’War. Photo by Simon de Glanville

You wanna know what the coolest thing about these bad boys is?
Each different kind of tentacle is actually a whole different type of organism.  
Portuguese Man (Men?) o’ War aren’t actually jellyfish at all (though they both belong to the same phylum), but siphonophores, colonial organisms that mass together into what appears to be one creature. Each different organism that makes up the different tentacles and the gas-filled swimming float has its own specialized function, and they work together symbiotically.  

Closeup of the tentacles of Portuguese Man O’War. Photo by Simon de Glanville

You wanna know what the coolest thing about these bad boys is?

Each different kind of tentacle is actually a whole different type of organism.  

Portuguese Man (Men?) o’ War aren’t actually jellyfish at all (though they both belong to the same phylum), but siphonophores, colonial organisms that mass together into what appears to be one creature. Each different organism that makes up the different tentacles and the gas-filled swimming float has its own specialized function, and they work together symbiotically.  

(Source: , via icarus-suraki)

colchrishadfield:

The Richat Structure. A giant gazing eye upon the Earth.

This formation always reminds me of a Venusian “pancake dome”, though I’m not sure it was formed via the same process.

colchrishadfield:

The Richat Structure. A giant gazing eye upon the Earth.

This formation always reminds me of a Venusian “pancake dome”, though I’m not sure it was formed via the same process.

fyeahdresdenfiles:

fuckdavee:

a-negative-age:

thegrizzlysong:

o m g

Not okay.

thats nuts

Looks like Dresden is in town…

Dresden Files references aside (which did get a lol out of me), I would like to reiterate my opinion that Midwesterners are fucking hardcore.  I have lived on the West Coast my entire life, where extreme weather is not a thing (I see lightning maybe once or twice a year, if even), and I can’t even imagine living in a place where supercell thunderstorms like this one are SOP every spring and summer.

fyeahdresdenfiles:

fuckdavee:

a-negative-age:

thegrizzlysong:

o m g

Not okay.

thats nuts

Looks like Dresden is in town…

Dresden Files references aside (which did get a lol out of me), I would like to reiterate my opinion that Midwesterners are fucking hardcore.  I have lived on the West Coast my entire life, where extreme weather is not a thing (I see lightning maybe once or twice a year, if even), and I can’t even imagine living in a place where supercell thunderstorms like this one are SOP every spring and summer.

(Source: entropybegets, via ensignw-deactivated20130725)


This is a closeup of the tentacles of Portuguese Man O’War (Physalia physalis)Photo by Simon de Glanville 

The coolest thing about Physalia?  It’s not a jellyfish.  It’s actually a composite organism called a siphonophore, made up of four separate organisms merged together in a colony.  Each different shape of tentacle is literally a different creature, and they work together to feed the whole.
Nature is goddamn amazing.

This is a closeup of the tentacles of Portuguese Man O’War (Physalia physalis)
Photo by Simon de Glanville 

The coolest thing about Physalia?  It’s not a jellyfish.  It’s actually a composite organism called a siphonophore, made up of four separate organisms merged together in a colony.  Each different shape of tentacle is literally a different creature, and they work together to feed the whole.

Nature is goddamn amazing.

(Source: , via icarus-suraki)

Volcanic lightning in the eruption of Mt. Pyuehue in Chile.

thesmithian:


…frost flowers, a strange phenomenon where frost grows from imperfections in the surface ice amid extreme sub-zero temperatures…forming spiky structures that have been found to house microorganisms. In fact, the bacteria found in the frost flowers is much more dense than in the frozen water below it, meaning each flower is essentially a temporary ecosystem, not unlike a coral reef…

more.

The world is just awesome.

thesmithian:

…frost flowers, a strange phenomenon where frost grows from imperfections in the surface ice amid extreme sub-zero temperatures…forming spiky structures that have been found to house microorganisms. In fact, the bacteria found in the frost flowers is much more dense than in the frozen water below it, meaning each flower is essentially a temporary ecosystem, not unlike a coral reef…

more.

The world is just awesome.

(via icarus-suraki)

mydetheturk:

alittlebitontuesdays:

synekdokee:

ethelindi:

pleasedontfindmyblogmom:

queenaglaia:

ponywithafez:

lady-digby-chicken-caesar:

stepharooni:

superboyfriends:

ethelindi:

Everyone probably knew this was coming.

#i legit CRY at this commercial #it actually makes me CRY #boom-dee-ada-boom-dee-ada #i just love the fucking world okay? #sobbing now

I JUST HAVE A LOT OF FEELINGS ABOUT THIS COMMERCIAL

I was just thinking about these commercials and how I wanted one on my tumblr, and now here it is!

Awkward confession time: whenever I feel like the world is shit and I can’t keep dealing with it, I watch this and/or read about cool science things to remind me that it’s not all bad. 

This makes me rethink a lot of things…

BOOM DE AYDA 

Every time I get another round of notifications from this I want it on my blog again.

I am a giant sap and this always make my chest a little tight

Makes me think of the Aubreyad because of a fanvid. But it’s beautiful.

I love this. Always have. Always will.

You go Discovery. You go.

Always reblog one of the greatest ads of this or any century.

(Source: skythrown)

So I HAD to look this up because jfc what an incredible shot.
This is an unusual lenticular cloud formation over Klyuchevskaya Sobka, an unusually symmetrical active stratovolcano in Russia’s Kamchatka peninsula.
Some more pics:





I want to go there.

So I HAD to look this up because jfc what an incredible shot.

This is an unusual lenticular cloud formation over Klyuchevskaya Sobka, an unusually symmetrical active stratovolcano in Russia’s Kamchatka peninsula.

Some more pics:

I want to go there.

(Source: letmyinspirationflow, via icarus-suraki)

A cloudy night over Canada…
…except those aren’t clouds at all.  They’re aurorae.

North America at night is easy to recognize in this view of our fair planet from orbit, acquired by the Suomi-NPP satellite on October 8. The spectacular waves of visible light emission rolling above the Canadian provinces of Quebec and Ontario in the upper half of the frame are the Aurora Borealis or northern lights. Encircling the poles and extending to lower latitudes, impressive aurorae seenduring the past few days are due to strong geomagnetic storms. The storms were triggered by a solar coronal mass ejection on October 4/5, impacting Earth’s magnetosphere some three days later. The curtains of light, shining well over 100 kilometers above the surface, are formed as charged particles accelerated in the magnetosphere excite oxygen and nitrogen in the upper atmosphere.

A cloudy night over Canada…

…except those aren’t clouds at all.  They’re aurorae.

North America at night is easy to recognize in this view of our fair planet from orbit, acquired by the Suomi-NPP satellite on October 8. The spectacular waves of visible light emission rolling above the Canadian provinces of Quebec and Ontario in the upper half of the frame are the Aurora Borealis or northern lights. Encircling the poles and extending to lower latitudes, impressive aurorae seenduring the past few days are due to strong geomagnetic storms. The storms were triggered by a solar coronal mass ejection on October 4/5, impacting Earth’s magnetosphere some three days later. The curtains of light, shining well over 100 kilometers above the surface, are formed as charged particles accelerated in the magnetosphere excite oxygen and nitrogen in the upper atmosphere.

Check these guys out!  These are Glass Frogs, a species of Central American tree frog with near-transparent skin on their abdomen and limbs.  

dduane:

bii0sfantasticmustache:

theamazingphenoiger:

darksideoftheshroom:

“The Lions Mane Jellyfish is the largest jellyfish in the world. They have been swimming in arctic waters since before the dinosaurs (over 650 million years ago) and are among some of the oldest surviving species in the world. The largest can come in at about 6 meters and has tentacles over 50 meters long.”

I think I 
Yeah
I never want to see one of those
ever
thanks

Whooooa! I’d love seeing one of those.

ETA: Photoshopped. Yet another fake.
(…Pity.)

WARNING: EXPO IS AN INSUFFERABLE PEDANT ALERT!
Also this is not a Lion’s Mane jellyfish at all.  Those look like this:


They can get to be pretty big, about the size of a large dinner plate or serving tray, and they do have the longest tentacles of any common jellyfish species.
The jellyfish in the OP’s (shopped) photo is a Nomura’s Jellyfish.  They’re common in the waters off of Japan and China—SO common, in fact, that they’re a menace.  


And make no mistake: they can get HUGE



…just, y’know.  Not so huge that they literally dwarf a human being.

dduane:

bii0sfantasticmustache:

theamazingphenoiger:

darksideoftheshroom:

“The Lions Mane Jellyfish is the largest jellyfish in the world. They have been swimming in arctic waters since before the dinosaurs (over 650 million years ago) and are among some of the oldest surviving species in the world. The largest can come in at about 6 meters and has tentacles over 50 meters long.”

I think I 

Yeah

I never want to see one of those

ever

thanks

Whooooa! I’d love seeing one of those.

ETA: Photoshopped. Yet another fake.

(…Pity.)

WARNING: EXPO IS AN INSUFFERABLE PEDANT ALERT!

Also this is not a Lion’s Mane jellyfish at all.  Those look like this:

They can get to be pretty big, about the size of a large dinner plate or serving tray, and they do have the longest tentacles of any common jellyfish species.

The jellyfish in the OP’s (shopped) photo is a Nomura’s Jellyfish.  They’re common in the waters off of Japan and China—SO common, in fact, that they’re a menace.  

And make no mistake: they can get HUGE

…just, y’know.  Not so huge that they literally dwarf a human being.


Some more amazing shots of volcanic lightning from around the world.